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Do type D personality and job demands-resources predict emotional exhaustion and work engagement? A 3-wave prospective study.

Bosmans, M.W.G., Setti, I., Sommovigo, V., Velden, P.G. van der. Do type D personality and job demands-resources predict emotional exhaustion and work engagement? A 3-wave prospective study. Personality and Individual Differences: 2019, 149, 167-173
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Objective
Cross-sectional studies suggest that Type D personality is a risk factor for work-related exhaustion and engagement, but longitudinal evidence is lacking. The present 3-wave study examined its longitudinal effects, taking into account existing job demands and resources, exhaustion, engagement, and neuroticism.

Methods
Data were extracted from the LISS-panel, based on a random sample of the Dutch population. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted among respondents (N=2273) who were employed during the 7-month study. Respondents worked in sectors varying from healthcare to industry.

Results
In the longitudinal analyses Type D personality was not a significant predictor for exhaustion/engagement over and above existing exhaustion/engagement, neuroticism, job demands and resources, in contrast to cross-sectional analyses. Job demands and resources explained a trivial proportion of variance of exhaustion and engagement in longitudinal analyses. Using the two elements of Type D personality (negative affectivity and social inhibition) did not change main findings. Existing exhaustion and engagement were significant and dominant predictors.

Conclusion
We found no evidence to prove that Type D personality is relevant in the development of emotional exhaustion and engagement. Findings stress the necessity of longitudinal studies controlling for corresponding variables assessed earlier to prevent overestimations of effects.