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Pharmacists’ responses to cues and concerns of polypharmacy patients during clinical medication reviews: a video observation study.

Eikenhorst, L. van, Dijk, L. van, Cords, J., Vervloet, M., Gier, H. de, Taxis, K. Pharmacists’ responses to cues and concerns of polypharmacy patients during clinical medication reviews: a video observation study. Patient Education and Counseling: 2020, 103(5), p. 930-936
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Objective
The research questions of this study are:
1) How do pharmacists respond to negative emotions of patients during a clinical medication review (CMR)?
2) How do patients express negative emotions during a CMR?
3) Who (pharmacist or patient) initiates a negative emotion to be discussed during a CMR?

Methods
We used video-recordings to observe 132 CMR interviews of 49 pharmacists. Videos were coded with the Verona coding definitions on emotional sequences(-provider responses) (VR-CoDES(-P)).

Results
In total 2538 negative emotions were identified, mainly expressed as cues (95.0 %). Often cues were expressed as verbal hints to hidden concerns (33.2 %) or were related to cognitive or physical causes (28.3 %).Three-quarters of the negative emotions were elicited by patients. 2670 pharmacists’ responses were coded. The most common response was non-explicit providing space (77.6 %) and the least common response was explicit reducing space (5.8 %).

Conclusion
Pharmacists are mainly non-explicitly providing space in their responses. While this hinders their ability to capture patients’ problems it also may enable patients to initiate topics. Practice implications: Pharmacists are able to respond to patients’ negative emotions. Training should focus on developing pharmacist’s skills to be more explicit in their responses to get more in-depth knowledge of patients’ problems.