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Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers and the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in antihypertensive patients.

Jong, H.J. de, Vandebriel, R.J., Saldi, S.R., Dijk, L. van, Loveren, H. van, Cohen-Tervaert, J.W., Klungel, O.H. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers and the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in antihypertensive patients. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety: 2011, 20(suppl. 1) s68. Abstract. 27th International Conference on Pharmacoepidemiology and Therapeutic Risk Management, 14-17 Augustus 2011, Chicago.
Background: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) have anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulating properties which are effective in the treatment of cardiovascular disease and in suppressing the symptoms of ongoing autoimmunity. On the other hand, these anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulating effects may facilitate the development of autoimmunity potentially resulting in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatic diseases. Objectives: To determine whether ACE inhibitors and ARBs use was associated with an increased risk of incident rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: A matched case-control study was conducted among antihypertensive patients using the Netherlands Information Network of General Practice (LINH) database from 2001 through 2006. Cases were patients over 40 years of age with a first-time diagnosis of RA. Each case was matched to up to five controls for age, sex, and index date which was selected one year before the first diagnosis of RA. ACE inhibitors and ARBs exposure was considered to be any prescription issued in the period before index date. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Our study included 211 cases and 667 matched controls. After controlling for potential confounders, users of ACE inhibitors or ARBs had adjusted ORs of 1.10 (95% CI: 0.77–1.57) and 1.06 (0.74–1.53), respectively. The adjusted ORs of incident RA among current and past users of ACE inhibitors were 1.14 (0.73–1.77) and 0.60 (0.27–1.30). Current and past use of ARBs had adjusted ORs of 1.38 (0.79–2.41) and 0.27 (0.05–1.51), respectively. Conclusions: Use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs is not associated with an increased risk of developing RA. (aut. ref.)
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