Publicatie

Publicatie datum

Home care patients' experiences with home care nurses' support in medication adherence.

Dijkstra, N., Vervloet, M., Sino, C.G.M., Heerdink, E.R., Nelissen-Vrancken, M.H.J.M.G., Bleijenberg, N., Bruin, M. de, Schoonhoven, L. Home care patients' experiences with home care nurses' support in medication adherence. Patient Preference and Adherence: 2021, 15, 1929-1940
Lees online
Purpose
To describe nurses’ support interventions for medication adherence, and patients’ experiences and desired improvements with this care.

Patients and Methods
A two-phase study was performed, including an analysis of questionnaire data and conducted interviews with members of the care panel of the Netherlands Patients Federation. The questionnaire assessed 14 types of interventions, satisfaction (score 0– 10) with received interventions, needs, experiences, and desired improvements in nurses’ support. Interviews further explored experiences and improvements. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a thematic analysis approach.

Results
Fifty-nine participants completed the questionnaire, and 14 of the 59 participants were interviewed. The satisfaction score for interventions was 7.9 (IQR 7– 9). The most common interventions were: “noticing when I don’t take medication as prescribed” (n = 35), “helping me to find solutions to overcome problems with using medications” (n = 32), “helping me with taking medication” (n = 32), and “explaining the importance of taking medication at the right moment” (n = 32). Fifteen participants missed ≥ 1 of the 14 interventions. Most mentioned the following: “regularly asking about potential problems with medication use” (33%), “regularly discussing whether using medication is going well” (29%), and “explaining the importance of taking medication at the right moment” (27%). Twenty-two participants experienced the following as positive: improved self-management of adequate medication taking, a professional patient–nurse relationship to discuss adherence problems, and nurses’ proactive attitude to arrange practical support for medication use. Thirteen patients experienced the following as negative: insufficient timing of home visits, rushed appearance of nurses, and insufficient expertise about side effects and taking medication. Suggested improvements included performing home visits on time, more time for providing support in medication use, and more expertise about side effects and administering medication.

Conclusion
Overall, participants were satisfied, and few participants wanted more interventions. Nurses’ support improved participants’ self-management of medication taking and enabled patients to discuss their adherence problems. Adequately timed home visits, more time for support, and accurate medication-related knowledge are desired.